Page last updated at 19:09 GMT, Friday, 8 August 2008 20:09 UK

Extra 'ingredient' in Cornish pie

A Cornish pasty maker has apologised to a customer who bit off more than he could chew.

Simon Enticknap, from Basingstoke, Hampshire, was enjoying a Ginsters chicken and mushroom slice before work when he crunched into a snail.

The 21-year-old took photographs of the pasty and offending mollusc before calling Ginsters to complain.

Ginsters has apologised for the "extra ingredient", which it believes came in a delivery of fresh mushrooms.

Mr Enticknap bought the pasty from a petrol station shop near Ringwood on his way to work last month.

I'm not at all thrilled and certainly won't be buying a chicken and mushroom slice again
Simon Enticknap

"It was about seven o'clock and I hadn't had any breakfast," he told BBC News.

"I'd eaten about half of it when there was a nasty crunch at my back teeth.

"I spat it out and when I realised what it was, I was physically sick out the van, although my mate thought it was hilarious."

Compensation offered

A Ginsters spokesman said the company had apologised in writing and a member of staff had been sent to Basingstoke to collect the offending product.

"It appears that the object came in with a delivery of fresh mushrooms and had not been removed by our rigorous washing process, which is an extremely rare occurrence," the spokesman said.

"We have sent a further letter of apology to Mr Enticknap along with Ł25 for the inconvenience caused, and we thanked Mr Enticknap for taking the trouble to bring the matter to our attention."

However, air conditioning fitter Mr Enticknap said he was not fully persuaded by Ginsters explanation.

"This was a whole snail and even if it escaped the washing process, I don't understand how it got through the slicing and chopping," he said.

"I'm not at all thrilled and certainly won't be buying a chicken and mushroom slice again."




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