Page last updated at 15:32 GMT, Friday, 25 July 2008 16:32 UK

Bogus 'Cornish' pasties face ban

Cornish pasty
Cornish pasties are crimped on one side and have a chunky filling

Pasty makers outside Cornwall could be banned from calling their snacks "Cornish" pasties under European rules.

Pasty makers in the county have won the backing of the Department for Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) to take their case for protected status to the EU.

The move would give the humble "oggy" the same status as Roquefort cheese, French Champagne, Jersey royal potatoes and Newcastle brown ale.

Cornish clotted cream producers won similar status in 1998.

GENUINE CORNISH PASTIES
Distinctive 'D' shape
Crimped on one side, never on top
Filling is chunky, made up of uncooked minced or roughly cut chunks of beef (not less than 12.5%), swede or turnip, potato and onion and a light peppery seasoning
Made in Cornwall

The Cornish Pasty Association (CPA) wants the European Commission to grant Protected Geographic Indication (PGI) status to pasties that are produced in Cornwall to a traditional recipe.

PGI status is awarded by the EU to foods that are unique to a particular geographic area. No other food can use the name of that registered product.

Angie Coombs, of the CPA, said: "The importance of the Cornish pasty industry to the wider Cornish economy cannot be stressed enough.

"Over 86 million Cornish pasties are collectively produced by the CPA members in Cornwall every year. All the members source a large percentage of ingredients locally and are important providers of year-round employment."

'Protect consumer'

She added: "Consumer demand is growing for Cornish pasties.

"This application is a genuine attempt to protect the consumer and encourage investment in local economies."

Mark Duddridge, managing director of Cornwall-based pasty producer Ginsters, said at least 40% of its products would be affected by PGI status.

"It's a very traditional food and there has been a revival recently. But there are a lot of pasties called Cornish which are nothing of the sort.

"Hopefully it will stop people being conned and raise awareness of the heritage and history of Cornish pasties."


SEE ALSO
Plea to keep 'Cornish' in pasty
17 Jan 08 |  Cornwall
Pasty firm sale nets tasty profit
12 Oct 07 |  Cornwall
Earning a crust outside Cornwall
04 Nov 05 |  Cornwall
Pasties challenge paella in Spain
06 Oct 05 |  Cornwall

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