Page last updated at 09:53 GMT, Friday, 19 June 2009 10:53 UK

Artefacts found at nature reserve

Bones from Iron Age ditch
Human remains have been found at the nature reserve

Human remains and Roman artefacts have been unearthed in an Iron Age ditch at a new nature reserve in Cambridgeshire.

Archaeologists made the discoveries at a former quarry at Cherry Hinton, near Cambridge, which is to open to visitors for the first time in 100 years.

East Pit has been transformed by the Cambridgeshire Wildlife Trust into a haven for wild flowers and birds.

English Heritage said it was "very significant" as the site of one of the few Iron Age ditches in the region.

Over the past few months, archaeologists from Oxford Archaeology East have been excavating the ditch.

They have found 300 fragments of Iron Age pottery that are being used to accurately date the monument.

'Fantastic opportunity'

Philip Walker, ancient monuments inspector at English Heritage, said: "This is a very significant site because there are not many Iron Age sites left in the region.

"The creation of East Pit Nature Reserve has given us a fantastic opportunity to find out more about the history of this special monument."

Mayor of Cambridge Russ McPherson and pupils from Colville Primary School in Cambridge will open the reserve later.

Martin Baker, conservation manager with Cambridgeshire Wildlife Trust, said: "We are delighted to welcome people to this new nature reserve to explore wildlife on their doorstep.

"It is a great opportunity for visitors to learn about the past while watching wildlife flourish and develop over the coming years."



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