Page last updated at 17:01 GMT, Friday, 1 May 2009 18:01 UK

Printing firm reduces job losses

Cambridge University Press
Cambridge University Press has been in business for about 450 years

Cambridge University Press (CUP) has confirmed that 48 members of staff from its printing department are to lose their jobs.

The number is down from the 133 job cuts announced by the company in February, following negotiations with the union Unite.

The firm said a further 25 staff would be redeployed to other parts of the business, which is based in Cambridge.

It is expected 72 jobs, up from 37 in February, will be kept in printing.

The company said its print division Cambridge Printing Services Limited (CPSL) had been going through an extremely difficult time in the past few years.

It is facing a £2m-a-year loss from 2009 onwards, said the firm.

We believe we now have a workable solution that will safeguard the future of our business, while recognising the needs of our staff
Chief executive Stephen Bourne

In February, consultation started over the original plans to cut 133 jobs.

The firm said voluntary redundancies would be encouraged wherever possible, and improved redundancy terms had been agreed.

The terms include a £3,000 training grant for each affected staff member.

Eight redundancies have also been announced in the CUP's UK Education publishing business, and two in the Cambridge-Hitachi joint venture.

'Painful for staff'

Up to 30 job losses were originally planned in these areas, but many staff have been successfully redeployed to other parts of the business.

Despite losses in the printing part of its business, the CUP is performing well overall, said the firm.

Ann Field, Unite's national officer for the print sector, said: "Although the loss of any jobs will be painful for people affected... union officials are glad that more jobs have been saved and that printing will continue."

CUP chief executive Stephen Bourne said: "Whilst we are all pleased that the number of redundancies is far lower than we originally anticipated, it is still a difficult time for all involved.

"We believe we now have a workable solution that will safeguard the future of our business, while recognising the needs of our staff."



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