Page last updated at 10:17 GMT, Friday, 17 October 2008 11:17 UK

Flood-hit town plans new defences

People in parts of Cambridgeshire hit by floods in 1998 and 2003 are being invited to a public meeting to air plans which could protect their homes.

The proposed scheme, following a study into the floods in Godmanchester, showed the current level of protection could be improved.

The new plans aim to reduce the risk of flooding to 600 properties from 1 in 10 years to 1 in 100 years.

The event on 31 October is being organised by the Environment Agency.

New flood defences

The Agency has compared several options for managing flood risk through Godmanchester and is recommending that new flood defences are built along between the town and river.

The majority of the defences will pass through private gardens.

Some of the new flood defences will pass through public spaces, most notably the Causeway where a flood defence of 30cm (0.9ft) in height is proposed.

The exhibition is taking place at the School Hall near the Chinese bridge, Post Street.

The final scheme will submitted for planning permission in 2009 with construction in 2010.




SEE ALSO
Agency warns of severe flooding
16 Mar 08 |  England
Campaign urges flood-risk checks
21 Apr 07 |  England
Agency stays on watch for floods
07 Oct 06 |  England

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