Page last updated at 13:31 GMT, Thursday, 4 February 2010

Oldbury nuclear station plan exhibition opens

Plans for a new nuclear power station in South Gloucestershire have gone on display.

The site of the former Oldbury Nuclear Power station is one of 10 places identified as potential sites for new stations by the government.

The exhibition has opened at Turnberrie's Community Centre and there will be a public discussion at Thornbury Leisure Centre on Saturday.

Campaigners opposed to the station have said they will stage a protest.

Ministers have said £2bn could be pumped into the economy and 9,000 jobs created if Oldbury had the station.

Protesters' concerns

The three-day exhibition, organised by the Department of Energy and Climate Change, ends on Saturday.

Oldbury is one of 10 potential sites for new nuclear stations listed by the government in its draft Nuclear National Policy Statement, published on 9 November.

Energy and Climate Change Minister Lord Hunt said hosting a nuclear power station would mean that Oldbury "would continue to play a big part in helping the UK transform its energy sector".

The department is conducting a 15-week consultation.

However, Shepperdine Against Nuclear Energy said it would hold a silent protest before Saturday's discussion, where government officials will be present.

A spokesman for the group said its concerns included possible health risks and harm to the environment.



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