Page last updated at 15:30 GMT, Wednesday, 7 October 2009 16:30 UK

School ban for Miss Sexy trousers

Girl's trousers at Nailsea School
Ten girls at Nailsea School have been disciplined for wearing Miss Sexy

A school has banned popular Miss Sexy trousers - because they are too revealing.

David New, headteacher of Nailsea School in North Somerset, has vetoed Miss Sexy trousers for having visible zips and being too tight.

Ten offending pupils have been hauled into his office for wearing the offending trousers.

But some parents say the provocative title is just a brand name and Mr New is being "petty".

The Miss Sexy trousers, which are black and cost about £10, had been tolerated in the past, but a switch to a new £32m school premises coincided with a uniform crackdown.

Andy Bartlett's daughter Abby, 13, spent nearly two hours in the headmaster's office on 7 September for arriving in the offending trousers.

However, because Abby had made an effort to customise the Miss Sexy trousers to conform with school rules, she was given a week to buy new ones.

'She wouldn't be happy'

Mr Bartlett, who is 43 and from Nailsea, said: "I feel it's all a bit petty. If they were wearing miniskirts or different colours I would understand.

"We're incredibly supportive of the school. But it's very difficult to to get clothes that fit girls of that age.

"Because of the shape she is, there's nothing we can do other than buy trousers that are quite slim.

"The trousers Mr New wants her to wear are too short. She just wouldn't be happy."

But Mr New said the Miss Sexy trousers revealed the shape of the students underwear and create a "negative impression" of the school, which has 1,350 pupils.

He said: "For every parent that has complained I have had tens saying how much they support the school."



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
School opened after 32m rebuild
05 Oct 09 |  Somerset
Call for cheaper school uniforms
21 Aug 09 |  England

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2013 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific