Page last updated at 15:22 GMT, Tuesday, 18 August 2009 16:22 UK

Stabbing attacks leave 10 injured

Cycle path near Easton Road
The attacks took place over a series of locations in the Easton area

Ten people, including two police community support officers (PCSOs), were stabbed in an "indiscriminate" series of attacks in Bristol.

The PCSOs were attempting to disarm a man who was believed to have been involved in a series of attacks with a penknife at about 1650 BST on Monday.

One was stabbed in the side, and another suffered wounds to his hands.

A 54-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of attempted murder and remains in custody.

The officers, one aged in his 20s and a colleague in his 30s, were called the scene on Russeltown Avenue in the Easton area of the city.

Indiscriminate attacks

Investigating officer Supt Julian Moss said: "They [the PCSOs] were on patrol when they were alerted by members of the public.

"They confronted the armed suspect and in doing so one received a hand wound and the other an injury to his side.

"These were indiscriminate attacks with no apparent motivation."

We saw one officer with his hand badly bleeding
eyewitness

Supt Moss added the offenders "state of mind" would form part of the investigation.

Eight members of the public, who were all male, were also wounded in the attacks.

None of the injuries are believed to be life-threatening.

The attacks followed an incident which is believed to have spilled on to the street, where the PCSOs were on duty.

One witness, who did not wish to be identified, told the BBC: "I saw a lot of police cars arriving.

"We went to have a look and we saw one officer with his hand badly bleeding and a chap lying on the floor. It's really shocking."



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