Page last updated at 11:48 GMT, Thursday, 13 November 2008

Designers in anti-terror training

UWE terror design training
Students will take part in a simulated terrorist attack using interactive tools

Architecture and urban planning students in Bristol are being trained in how to reduce the impact of terrorism in the buildings they design.

Students will take part in a session involving a simulated terrorist attack in a busy city centre environment.

The seminar will also raise possible future legal problems if counter terrorism measures are not considered.

The training is part of an initiative by the national Counter Terrorism Security Office.

'Very vulnerable'

The course, which is thought to be the first specially devised training session in the UK, will encourage students to think about how they can minimise the impact of a terrorist attack.

Sandra Manley, of the University of the West of England (UWE), said: "There are recent examples such as the attack at Glasgow Airport in July 2007 where important buildings have been very vulnerable to terrorist attack.

"There are also many buildings - such as football stadia - where large numbers of people gather, where the use of anti-terrorism measures in the design could be an important factor."

The training scenario is in line with a report on security and design produced by the Security Minister Lord West in November 2007.

Peter Naish, a counter terrorism security advisor from Avon and Somerset Police, who is co-ordinating the training, said: "We believe that there are many areas in which we can improve design to protect people and important infrastructure.

"By looking ahead to the future designers and planners we can make our buildings and our cities safer for those who live and work in them."

The project is being supported by the Royal Institute of British Architects and is taking place at UWE's Frenchay campus on 18 November.



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