Page last updated at 15:46 GMT, Thursday, 24 April 2008 16:46 UK

Woodland searched in terror probe

Andrew Ibrahim
Police have been granted until 1 May to question Mr Ibrahim

Police who searched woods near the Bristol home of a 19-year-old man being questioned under the Terrorism Act found nothing, it has emerged.

Avon and Somerset Police said the search of Badocks Wood was planned from the beginning of the investigation into Andrew Ibrahim, of Westbury-on-Trym.

Mr Ibrahim was arrested on 17 April and three controlled explosions were later carried out at his flat.

On Wednesday, police were granted until 1 May to question Mr Ibrahim.

Avon and Somerset police officers cordoned off Badocks Woods in nearby Southmead for the search on Thursday.

Some 50 officers spent several hours searching the area before calling the operation off at 1500 BST.

Recent conversion

Officers said they were searching Badocks Woods for "anything of significance to the investigation".

The area is less than 100 yards from Mr Ibrahim's house.

Neighbourhood policing Inspector Mark Jackson had earlier said: "The local community should be assured this action is being taken for public safety reasons, although there is no specific intelligence to suggest we are likely to find anything significant in the woodland."

Bristol City Council said one of its officers had been involved in the operation to ensure no disruption to the wood's nature reserve.

Mr Ibrahim, who moved to the area three weeks ago, is understood to have recently converted to Islam.

He was arrested after covert inquiries prompted by an intelligence tip-off from within the city's Muslim community.


SEE ALSO
Muslims 'raised terror concern'
22 Apr 08 |  Bristol/Somerset
Residents 'shocked' after arrest
18 Apr 08 |  Bristol/Somerset

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