Page last updated at 18:46 GMT, Tuesday, 19 January 2010

Teacher smashes throw-in record

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Footage of Danny Brooks's world record-beating throw-in

A PE teacher from West Yorkshire has broken a world record with the longest-ever football throw-in.

Danny Brooks, 28, launched a ball 49.78m (163ft) - half the length of a football field - with his unusual gymnast-style flip throw.

Mr Brooks, who teaches at Brooksbank School Sports College in Elland, said he got the idea after watching Stoke player Rory Delap's long throw-ins.

The previous record of 48.17m (158ft) was set by Michael Lochner in 1998.

Mr Brooks's method involves him taking a run-up and somersaulting with the ball in his hands before throwing it.

The technique is legal in football matches because he has two feet on the ground at the time of the throw.

'Bit of a surprise'

Mr Brooks told BBC News: "I started off as a gymnast from a young age and I also did my football as well.

"The original idea was to put the two together and see what I can get from it."

Mr Brooks said Delap's throw-in style had "reignited my interest in it to see if I can get anywhere near he can".

The amateur footballer said he had used his throw-ins in matches.

But he added: "I don't like to do it too often but it is a bit of a surprise to the opposition.

"They don't really like it that much."



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