Page last updated at 10:45 GMT, Thursday, 31 July 2008 11:45 UK

Pigeon feeders face being fined

Pigeon
The council said it had received complaints about feral pigeons

Dropping a few crumbs to feed the pigeons could soon land people in two West Yorkshire towns with a fine.

Kirklees Council is restricting feeding times to an hour each day, in two designated areas, in an attempt to control the number of feral birds.

Feeding will be allowed between 0700 and 0800 BST on the New Street precinct and Lower Brook Street in Huddersfield, and in Market Place in Dewsbury.

People feeding pigeons outside those times in those areas will be fined 75.

'Compulsive feeders'

The council's cabinet approved the plan because feral pigeons can spread disease, foul buildings and increase cleaning costs.

Councillor David Hall said: "The issue of controlling the population of pigeons seems to be one that sets off emotions in various directions.

"However, we do get a lot of complaints from the public, traders and town centre organisations about the nuisance caused by pigeons.

"In our two main town centres we do seem to have a number of compulsive pigeon-feeders, people who simply do not get or accept the message that pigeons are a health hazard and should not be fed."

The designated spots will be cleaned immediately after the feeding period, Mr Hall said.


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