Page last updated at 11:25 GMT, Wednesday, 11 March 2009

Three convicted of election fraud

Three men have been found guilty of charges relating to election fraud in a Berkshire town.

The counts related to an election in the Slough Central ward in May 2007 where Labour councillor Lydia Simmons lost her seat to Tory Raja Khan.

Khan, along with two others, had previously admitted the offences. Three other men were convicted by a jury.

The men, who are all from Slough, were bailed to be sentenced at Reading Crown Court on 1 May.

Khan, 52, of Oban Court, Montem Lane, admitted conspiracy to defraud the returning officer and perjury. He has since been expelled from the Conservative Party.

Gul Nawaz Khan, 57, of Richmond Crescent, pleaded guilty to perjury.

Hung jury

And Mohammed Khan, 46, of Mirador Crescent, admitted conspiracy to defraud the returning officer and conspiracy to pervert the course of justice.

Arshad Raja, 53, of Broadmark Road, was found guilty of conspiracy to defraud the returning officer.

Mahboob Khan, 46, of Quinbrookes, was convicted of conspiracy to defraud, conspiracy to pervert the course of justice and perjury.

Altaf Khan, 31, of Knolton Way, was found guilty of impersonation but not guilty of conspiracy to defraud the returning officer.

Yasar Mumtaz, 20, of Wellesley Road, was cleared of conspiracy to defraud the returning officer.

Former deputy mayor Mohammed Aziz, 50, of Wellesley Road, was found not guilty on the direction of the judge of conspiracy to defraud the returning officer after the jury had failed to reach a verdict.

The prosecution said it would not be seeking a retrial the the case of Mr Aziz.

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