Page last updated at 17:40 GMT, Thursday, 23 October 2008 18:40 UK

Homeless man claims Macca reward

Paul McCartney wax head
The head is listed to sell for between 5,000 and 10,000

A homeless man has claimed a 2,000 reward by returning a waxwork head of ex-Beatle Sir Paul McCartney which had been left on a train.

Anthony Silva found the item in a bin at Reading station after auctioneer Joby Carter left it under a seat at Maidenhead station last Thursday.

Mr Carter said the man thought it was a Halloween mask and had been using it as a pillow before realising what it was.

The wax model will be auctioned on Sunday and could fetch up to 10,000.

Mr Carter told BBC News Online: "I am just so happy to get it back.

First auction

"It was a bizarre ending with this man saying he found it in a bin.

"He told me he had just become homeless so I hope the 2,000 reward can help him."

The waxwork model was made in the 1960s and displayed at the Louis Tussauds museum in Great Yarmouth.

Carter's Entertainment auctioneers are selling it along with other fairground memorabilia in Maidenhead, Berkshire.

It will be the first auction organised by Mr Carter.

"I will be keeping a close eye on it until it sells on Sunday, you can't imagine the problems it has caused," he added.

Since the publicity, interest in the item has come in from Japan and America.


SEE ALSO
Man claims Macca's wax head find
22 Oct 08 |  Berkshire
Sir Paul's wax head left on train
20 Oct 08 |  Berkshire
McCartney to release dance record
29 Sep 08 |  Entertainment
Israelis flock to McCartney show
26 Sep 08 |  Entertainment
Sir Paul to play Israel concert
27 Aug 08 |  Entertainment

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