Page last updated at 17:29 GMT, Monday, 8 February 2010

Hunger strike at Yarl's Wood immigration centre

Yarl's Wood
The women at Yarl's Wood are protesting over treatment at the site

A group of women at Yarl's Wood immigration centre in Bedfordshire who started a hunger strike have ended a protest over their treatment.

The National Coalition of Anti-Deportation Campaigns (NCADC) said the women went on hunger strike on Friday protesting at the length of their stay.

The UK Border Agency (UKBA) said 40 women involved in the protest were separated from other detainees.

A statement said the issues had been resolved by staff.

David Wood, of the UKBA, said the group of women had been separated from other detainees while staff tried to resolve their concerns.

Legal advice

Mr Wood added: "The well-being of detainees is of paramount concern to the UK Border Agency, which is why healthcare staff are at the scene to monitor developments.

"The detainees will be integrated back into the centre at the earliest opportunity.

"All detainees are treated with dignity and respect, with access to legal advice and heath care facilities.

"We only remove those who both the UKBA and the independent courts deem to have no legal right to be here."

The NDADC said a group of women had been isolated in a corridor in one area of the centre.

An NDADC spokesman said: "The strike was sparked to protest and demand that the frustration and humiliation of all foreign nationals ends now."



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Hunger strike at immigrant centre
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13 Nov 08 |  England

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