Page last updated at 14:50 GMT, Friday, 11 September 2009 15:50 UK

Woman fined over baby death crash

A woman who admitted causing the death of a baby in a car crash in Bedfordshire has been fined £2,500.

Sharon Cashman, 50, of Ampthill, pulled out in front of a car being driven four-month-old Logan Pie's father, Joshua, Luton Crown Court heard.

Attempting to avoid her, Mr Pie swerved into the path of an oncoming lorry.

Cashman, who admitted causing death by driving without due care and attention, was also banned from driving and ordered to do 200 hours of unpaid work.

Sentencing her Judge John Bevan QC said: "She made an error of judgement which I have no doubt has haunted her ever since and will continue to do so."

Family outing

He said the consequences of her actions that day had "devastated the lives" of Logan's family.

Logan, of Dorchester Avenue, Bletchley, near Milton Keynes, was in his father's Vauxhall Astra when the crash happened on 18 December.

The baby's mother and his 19-month-old sister were also in the car, which was travelling towards Flitwick on Woburn Road.

Prosecutors said Cashman, of Crayton Road, pulled out of a junction, in her Honda Civic, in to the path of the family's car.

The Astra then collided with the Honda and an on-coming lorry.

Logan was taken to Bedford Hospital before being transferred to Great Ormond Street Hospital in London. He died two days later when his life support machine was switched off.

Ian Hope, defending, said Cashman accepted full responsibility.



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