Page last updated at 10:17 GMT, Thursday, 30 October 2008

Study explores river life of fish

Barbel
The breeding habits of the barbel are unknown

The Environment Agency is starting a three-year study exploring the movements of one of the east of England's most secretive fish.

Over recent years, the Great Ouse in Milton Keynes and Bedfordshire has become synonymous with barbel but little is known about their movements.

The 50,000 project will try and find out more about breeding habits.

The ancient fish is important to rivers and features on Queen's College, Cambridge University, coat of arms.

The Environment Agency will be working closely with the Upper Ouse Fisheries Consultative Association (UOFCA).

Ian Hirst, fisheries specialist, said: "The popularity of fishing for barbel has grown over the past decade. We are struggling to understand where the young barbel are coming from.

"We hope this study will use local knowledge, feedback and advice from UOFCA members to help us build a clear picture of the barbel in our river and ensure there are plenty of fish for future anglers in the Great Ouse."

Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Survey finds healthy fish stocks
12 Dec 07 |  Norfolk
Thousands of fish added to rivers
19 Nov 07 |  Staffordshire
Fish rescued from power station
11 Aug 05 |  Shropshire
Fish drags angler to death
06 Dec 03 |  Berkshire

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific