Page last updated at 10:21 GMT, Tuesday, 16 March 2010

West Midlands police officer cleared of crash charge

A police chief inspector accused of failing to stop after hitting a student with his car has been cleared.

Jamie Jones, 38, of West Midlands Police, had been charged with misconduct in public office by failing to stop at the scene last year.

The court had previously heard his car struck University of Warwick student Raymond Cheung on the A45 in Coventry.

West Midlands Police said an internal investigation was ongoing and Mr Jones remained suspended.

Windscreen shattered

The crash took place as Mr Jones, who was off duty at the time, drove along the Coventry-bound carriageway during the early hours of 8 March.

The jury had been told his car windscreen shattered in the crash but he later said he thought he had hit a post.

The court also heard the chief inspector was not to blame for the crash as Mr Cheung emerged onto the road just a second or two before the collision.

Mr Cheung, 20, a student from Hong Kong, had recently had a "falling out" with a female student and may have walked into oncoming traffic intentionally, the jury heard.

West Midlands Police said the decision to prosecute him had been taken by the Crown Prosecution Service after consultations with the police and a detailed investigation.

"There remains the matter of internal misconduct proceedings so it would be inappropriate to comment further at this stage.

"Mr Jones remains suspended at this present time," a statement said.



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