Page last updated at 12:21 GMT, Sunday, 31 January 2010

Road sign errors hit taxpayers

Councils have paid hundreds of pounds to correct street signs with spelling and punctuation mistakes and missing information, it has been revealed.

At least 14 local authorities said they had to foot the bill because of errors by staff since January 2003.

Westminster Council said five signs cost £1,185 to correct and Luton Council said two errors cost £118.

Brighton and Hove, Exeter, Dover and Oxford councils were among those paying out to correct inaccurate street signs.

Canterbury City Council said it paid £279.50 in October 2008 to correct two plates which had the words Sherins Walk instead of Sherrins Alley.

Brighton and Hove City Council said in July last year a wall sign for St James's Street in Kemp Town was erected without the apostrophe, costing £165.29 to fix.

Luton Borough Council said one error was Argyll Avenue which was spelt as Argyle Avenue, and another was Cowdray Close which was spelt on the original order as Cowray Close.

SIGNS OF THE TIMES
Ashford: Two signs replaced as a result of spelling mistakes at a total cost of £204.74
Bournemouth: Sign altered at a cost of £20 because the apostrophe in "children's" was initially put in the wrong place
Broadland, Norwich: Misspelt nameplate amended at a cost of £31.65
Cotswolds: Two signs with mistakes replaced at a total cost of £110
Derby : Brown tourism sign corrected from Gallerys to Galleries at a cost of around £20
Leicester: One sign replaced because of a spelling mistake at a cost of less than £100

Oxford City Council said a street nameplate had to be replaced in February last year when a Kenilworth Road sign was made instead of one for Kenilworth Avenue. This cost £126.00, excluding VAT, to replace.

In 2008 Exeter City Council said a sign read United Reform Church instead of United Reformed Church in Fore Street, Heavitree. A street nameplate also had a mistake on it.

Two new street nameplates cost Dover District Council about £100 in July 2005.

The council said: "It was in respect of Wilcox Close, Aylesham.

"The error was that a nameplate had been ordered with a double 'l', so the error was that of the district council."

Vale of White Horse District Council in Oxfordshire said the name Limetree Close in Grove was missed off two signs, costing £124 to fix.

Westminster City Council said it was not aware of any street signs being replaced because of bad punctuation since January 2003, but then went on to list several such errors.

The signs are Bishops Bridge Road, which should be Bishop's Bridge Road; Lord Hill's Bridge, which should be Lord Hills Bridge; Kensington Garden Square, which should be Kensington Gardens Square; Princes Square, which should be Prince's Square; and Kings Scholars Passage, which should be King's Scholars' Passage.

Other councils said they did not collect the data or claimed the request exceeded time and cost limits under freedom of information law.


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