Page last updated at 14:57 GMT, Wednesday, 15 October 2008 15:57 UK

Appeal date for Newlove killers

Adam Swellings (left) and Stephen Sorton
Swellings and Sorton were convicted of murder in February

Two youths convicted of kicking a man to death outside his home in Cheshire will begin their appeals in November.

Adam Swellings, 19, of Crewe, is to challenge his conviction and sentence for the murder of Garry Newlove.

Stephen Sorton, 17, of Warrington, will appeal against his 15-year minimum jail term for his part in the murder of the 47-year-old in the town in August 2007.

They were among three teenagers jailed for the attack. The hearing will begin at the Court of Appeal on 13 November.

A trial at Chester Crown Court heard that Mr Newlove's head was "kicked like a football" during the attack.

The father-of-three was set upon after remonstrating with a gang of youths who had vandalised his wife's car.

Garry Newlove
Mr Newlove was kicked "like a football" in the attack, the court heard

Mr Newlove, a plastics company salesman, was attacked as his three daughters, aged 18, 16 and 13, looked on.

Following the convictions, it emerged that Swellings had been released from custody for an assault just hours before the attack.

He was freed on bail on condition he stayed away from Warrington but he remained in the town.

A third member of the gang - Jordan Cunliffe, 16, formerly of Warrington - was also jailed for life and ordered to serve a minimum of 12 years.

Mr Newlove's murder sparked a national debate about Britain's so-called yob culture.

His widow, Helen, appeared at the recent Conservative party conference to campaign against youth violence.


SEE ALSO
Newlove killers granted appeal
22 May 08 |  England
Newlove killer lodges appeal bid
16 Apr 08 |  England

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