Page last updated at 10:33 GMT, Tuesday, 1 April 2008 11:33 UK

Young drivers can opt for no fine

Car crash wreckage
The course will highlight the possible consequences of their driving

Young drivers who commit traffic offences in Berkshire, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire can now escape a fine and points on their licence.

Under Thames Valley Police's new Young Driver Scheme, drivers under the age of 25 arrested for some traffic offences can opt to take a course instead.

Road crashes are the leading cause of death for 16 to 25-year-olds.

The new scheme aims reduce the risk of young drivers becoming involved in serious and fatal road collisions.

Thames Valley Police said national figures also showed that two-thirds of young drivers killed in collisions had previously been in either a less serious collision, or had committed a road traffic offence.

This scheme aims to challenge the skills of less than responsible young drivers and their belief that they are invincible
Supt Mick Doyle

In Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire, more than one-third of all crash casualties involve 16 to 25-year-olds.

The course option will be open to drivers caught committing offences that would normally result in a 60 fine and three points.

In some cases young motorists arrested for careless driving after being involved in a collision, may also qualify.

During the course, offenders will find out about the consequences of their driving.

Supt Mick Doyle, head of roads policing at Thames Valley Police, said: "Young drivers, particularly young men and young passengers feature disproportionately in UK and global road casualty figures.

"This scheme aims to challenge the skills of less than responsible young drivers and their belief that they are invincible."


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