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Last Updated: Monday, 10 March 2008, 21:09 GMT
Trees damage power lines in storm

About 5,000 homes in Devon and Cornwall remain without electricity after trees brought down power lines in winds gusting up to 82 mph (130km/h).

Power engineers are working to restore supplies as trees damaged cables.

Roads were closed in coastal areas of Cornwall and Devon amid rising water from spring tides.

Emergency services said they were kept busy with a spate of road accidents and further damage was reported on Monday night as the storm continued.

ROADS CLOSED BY FLOODING
Looe. Picture from David Welch
North Road, Looe
Flushing in Cornwall
Cowley Hill, Devon

The highest recorded wind speed was reported as 82mph in Berry Head in Brixham, south Devon.

Sharon Cross of Western Power said: "We're working on all the faults at the moment, but we are more worried about what is coming when there are more high winds forecast."

The Torpoint ferry across the Tamar in Plymouth was suspended amid flooding in Devonport.

Dartmouth Higher Ferry was closed and Kingsbridge Quay was also closed off.

'Mindless' youths

Cross Country Trains said services were being disrupted due to poor weather conditions between Newton Abbot and Exeter St David's and First Great Western were running with 45-minute delays.

In Ashburton, Devon, the wind was strong enough to blow a trampoline over a 20ft (6m) high garden wall.

In Torquay, collapsed scaffolding closed East Street on Monday morning and a flat roof was blown off a garage in Mount Pleasant Road.

ROADS CLOSED BY TREES
Road between New Mill and Trye Farm on the Penzance to Zennnor Road
Penryn bypass
Tree down on the A39 near Carnon Downs Roundabout

Police criticised "mindless" youths seen playing "chicken" with large waves breaking over seafront walls.

The youths were spotted at the height of the storm in the Tinside Pool area of Plymouth in Devon.

"This is a particularly mindless activity to pursue in light of the powerful weather," said a spokesman.

They were not only risking their lives, but those of the emergency services who would be required to rescue them should they be swept into the sea, added the spokesman.

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Waves buffet the Cornish coast



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