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Tuesday, 18 February, 2003, 14:12 GMT
Surgeon hid ban to get work
General Medical Council
The GMC had placed restrictions on Senchaudhuri
A doctor who ignored a ban on surgery after botching three bone operations has been struck off the medical register.

Nalini Senchaudhuri, 62, took up three new jobs despite being found guilty of serious professional misconduct 18 months ago.

The orthopaedic surgeon went on to carry out operations on patients in north-east England, causing a woman to spend six months in hospital after displacing her fractured bone.

A hearing of the General Medical Council (GMC) was told Senchaudhuri showed a "blatant disregard" for its role to protect the public.

I'm horrified that hospitals failed to check his record and potentially put patients' health in danger

Carole Sowerby, patient

Senchaudhuri, who qualified in Calcutta before coming to England in 1976, was first brought before the GMC in September 2001 for a series of errors.

But 18 months later he concealed restrictions placed on him by the GMC to take up a job at Gateshead's Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

Professor Jack Crane, chairman of the GMC's professional conduct committee, told Senchaudhuri: "The committee are seriously concerned that you have shown a lack of insight into your responsibility towards employers, colleagues and the public.

"In view of your serious breach of the conditions, the committee have directed that your name should be erased from the register."

Senchaudhuri said he would appeal to the Medical Protection Society.

'Serious questions'

County Durham patient Carole Sowerby needed walking sticks after a procedure to straighten her toes at Bishop Auckland Hospital in 1994 went disastrously wrong.

Mrs Sowerby, 57, said: "I'm horrified that not just one but three hospitals failed to check his GMC record and potentially put patients' health in danger."

A spokeswoman for South Durham and Weardale Community Health Council, which covers the Bishop Auckland area, said: "Serious questions should be asked about why none of these trusts checked with the GMC before allowing this doctor to operate."

Health chiefs in Gateshead have promised to tighten up recruitment procedures and said Senchaudhuri was sacked as soon as the Trust became aware of the situation.

He also worked at hospitals in Bristol, Uxbridge and York

Senchaudhuri, of Du Cane Court, Balham High Road, south west London, told the hearing that he presumed employers had been told by his agency.


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14 Feb 03 | Health
19 Nov 02 | England
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