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Friday, 31 January, 2003, 07:01 GMT
Bollard amnesty declared
A bollard
It is estimated the bollards wil cost 47,000 to replace
An increase in the number of traffic bollards being stolen in Solihull has led to the council granting an amnesty for their return.

Adventurous thieves have apparently been spurning the traditional traffic cone in favour of their luminous counterparts.

The council said 120 bollards have disappeared in the Solihull area in the last year.

The authority estimates the total bill for replacing damaged and stolen bollards is 47,000.

I think it's all part of this urban chic that's very fashionable at the moment

Hanna Jaaskelainen

Jeanette McGarry from Solihull Metropolitan Borough Council said some people appeared to believe that bollards were fair game.

"I received a telephone call from somebody's father not so long ago.

"He told me that his son had one in his bedroom that they were trying to clean up and it didn't clean up very well, so could we let them have a new one?

"So I suspect that some people are taking them as bedroom furniture or as a prank," she added.

Street influence

Hanna Jaaskelainen from furniture shop Fusion, described as a "lifestyle store", has her own theories as to why the bollards are going missing.

"I think it's all part of this urban chic that's very fashionable at the moment," she said.

"People are picking up the influence from the streets."

Jeanette McGarry stressed that there would be no repurcussions for anyone who returned bollards.

"We'd really like to appeal to their better nature.

"No questions asked - please do bring them back to our Moat Lane depot."


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See also:

15 Jan 03 | England
23 May 02 | Scotland
17 Jul 01 | UK
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