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EDITIONS
 Tuesday, 21 January, 2003, 10:07 GMT
National Trust buys Morris house
Red House
Red House is decorated in a medieval style
A house described as a landmark of British architecture will be opened to the public after being bought by the National Trust.

Red House in Bexleyheath, south-east London has been purchased for an undisclosed sum, believed to be around 2m, from the estate of late architect Edward Hollamby.

It was commissioned by the designer William Morris and designed by Philip Webb, both founders of the arts and crafts movement.

Morris lived in the house with his wife for five years from 1859 and decorated it in a medieval style with bright colours and strong patterns.

'Enhance lives'

Linda Parry, President of the William Morris Society, said the acquisition of the Red House was of "major importance".

She added: "One of the most important and influential of all nineteenth century buildings in Britain is now available to all."

The house gets its name from its red bricks and the steep red-tiled roof. Its garden inspired much of Morris' early designs of wallpaper and fabric.

Described as "more a poem than a house" by the painter Dante Gabriel Rossetti, it is considered important in the development of the arts and crafts movement.

Keith Halstead, of the National Trust said: "William Morris and the founders of the National Trust shared a belief in the power of beauty to enhance the quality of our lives and this principle is as relevant today as it was 150 years ago."

The National Trust plans to open the house and garden to visitors from early summer 2003.

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  ON THIS STORY
  BBC London's Sarah Harris
"In the unlikely surroundings of an housing estate in suburban Bexleyheath lies the home of William Morris"

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See also:

19 Sep 02 | Entertainment
06 Aug 02 | England
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