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EDITIONS
 Monday, 20 January, 2003, 11:47 GMT
Tube passengers air their gripes
Tube passengers
Being considerate keeps the Tube moving says LU
People who try to push on to a carriage before letting passengers off has been voted the habit commuters hate most on the Tube.

More than 20,000 people voted for their pet travel hates on London Underground's website in December.

More than 4,000 - about 20% - put the ill-mannered pushers top of their hate list, with people begging for money a close second.

The "etiquette poll" was so successful that it is to become a permanent feature to help people get things off their chest.

The angry get the chance to get it off their chests and the guilty may spot themselves there and perhaps try to mend their ways

Peter Wilson, thetube.com

The range of pet hates irritated travellers could vote for ranged from people who put their feet on the seats (2%) to those who drop litter (1%).

Only 2% found mobile phones ringing tones irritating, while twice that number hated those who played their personal stereos too loudly.

Nearly 2,000 (9%) complained about fellow passengers who did not say "excuse me" and 3% loathed people who stood on the left on escalators.

London Underground said it wanted to encourage the network's three million passengers to be more considerate towards each other because it also helped keep the Tube system moving.

Standing on the right on escalators allows those in a hurry to get past while not obstructing train doors cuts down on delays.

Peter Wilson of thetube.com, LU's website, said: "The angry get the chance to get it off their chests and the guilty may spot themselves there and perhaps try to mend their ways."

See also:

10 Jan 03 | England
08 Jan 03 | England
13 Nov 02 | England
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