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EDITIONS
 Thursday, 16 January, 2003, 16:39 GMT
Dredging of harbour divides town
Hayle harbour
Dredging reduces the amount of silt in Hayle harbour
Residents in west Cornwall are divided over plans to restrict the dredging of a picturesque harbour.

Penwith district councillors discussed a report on Wednesday night on the impact of removing sand from Hayle harbour.

The independent Coastal Process Study suggests the removal of sand has been detrimental to the bay.

But many say that if the dredging stopped, plans for the development of the harbour would be put at risk.

It is important the dredging should only take place in a regulated manner

Martin Hayley, Penwith District Council
The removal of sand has been carried out for years so vessels can safely navigate the channel into Hayle harbour.

The council's director of public services, Martin Hayley, said dredging would not be banned, but it had to be regulated.

"The report, which we commissioned, says the major reason for the loss of sand from the beaches is the natural wave and tide processes," he said.

Coastal erosion

"But the dredging operation continuing in an unregulated way does also contribute.

"It is important the dredging should only take place in a regulated manner, following discussions between ourselves, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and other statutory bodies."

Local pressure group Save Our Sands claims the dredging has caused premature coastal erosion to the beach and surrounding bay.

Secretary Jackie Pearce said: "There is definitely a reduction in the sand on the beach and it is in a very parlous state.

Dredging vital

"It is the worst it has been in living memory and no more sand should be moved until an equilibrium has been established."

But Jeremy Joslin, chairman of Hayle's chamber of commerce, said the dredging was vital to Hayle's economy.

"What is most important is the development of Hayle and the creation of jobs," he said.

"I want the harbour to operate and keep the fishermen's jobs.

"I want the harbour to be developed and everybody in the town to benefit from the redevelopment."


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17 Dec 01 | England
18 Sep 01 | UK
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