BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
    You are in: UK: England  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
 Thursday, 16 January, 2003, 08:08 GMT
Sick man demands right to die
George Faulkner
Dying man calls for change in euthanasia law
A grandfather who is terminally ill is campaigning for the right to die.

George Faulkner, from the Meadows in Nottingham, has Motor Neurone Disease, which means he cannot walk or talk and is in constant pain.

His family say his quality of life is now so appalling they cannot bear to see him suffer any longer.

However, The British Medical Association says it has no plans to call for a change in the law regarding assisted suicides.

Parliament decides

George Faulkner's case follows that of Diane Pretty, who also suffered from the disease.

She asked the European Court of Human Rights to allow her husband to help her to die.

She lost her case and died soon after.

John Grenville
John Grenville, BMA, dismisses law change

John Grenville from the British Medical Association said: "It is not for doctors to make the law and it is not for doctors to interpret the law.

"It is for Parliament to make the law and Parliament has to reflect what it feels society wants."

At 53, George relies on his wife to do everything for him.

Susan Cross, George's wife said:"He got pins and needles in his legs and started falling over for no reason at all.

"He just sits there praying to die."

Doctors cannot tell George how long he has left to live, but he is determined to continue campaigning for a change in the law so his suffering can end.

When George was asked how he felt he managed: "I've had enough."


Click here to go to Nottingham
See also:

27 May 01 | Health
18 Jan 01 | Health
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more England stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more England stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes