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 Wednesday, 15 January, 2003, 21:50 GMT
GP 'dowsed for homeopathic remedy'
Bethan and Kira Jinkinson
Bethan Jinkinson complained about Kira's treatment
A mother was told by her GP that her 11-month-old daughter's illness may have been caused by geopathic stress patterns beneath her home.

Bethan Jinkinson claimed Dr Michelle Langdon then used the practice of dowsing to select a homeopathic remedy for her daughter, Kira, who had a stomach upset.

Dr Langdon, who practises at the Brunswick Medical Centre in Bloomsbury, central London, appeared before the General Medical Council (GMC) accused of serious professional misconduct.

She denied giving inadequate care to three patients between June 2000 and October 2002 and said she offered patients either conventional treatment or homeopathic alternatives.

Dr Michelle Langdon
Dr Michelle Langdon leaves the GMC
Ms Jinkinson took her daughter to Dr Langdon in October 2000.

On the second consultation, Ms Jinkinson said she was told geopathic stress patterns beneath her home may be causing her daughter's condition.

The GMC's professional conduct committee heard that Kira was taken to the accident and emergency department of University College Hospital later that day, where she was diagnosed as suffering from gastroenteritis.

The GMC heard evidence of two other cases where Dr Langdon used homeopathic remedies and treatments allegedly without the consent of her patients.

The panel asked her whether using the practice of dowsing might seem "weird to the uninitiated patient".

She told them she may have misinterpreted her relationship with Bethan Jinkinson.

She denied putting patients at risk and said they welcomed her techniques.

The hearing continues.


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09 Dec 02 | England
07 Nov 01 | Health
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