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 Tuesday, 14 January, 2003, 09:31 GMT
Festival boss promises better security
Glastonbury Festival
Organisers hope the 2003 festival will still go ahead
Glastonbury Festival organisers are offering to increase security for local people after concerns about crime levels during last year's event.

The move comes after councillors in Shepton Mallet, Somerset, rejected a licence application in December, when villagers complained about an increase in crime.

Festival boss Michael Eavis, who is appealing against the decision, is hoping plans to install 50 CCTV cameras at known trouble spots in the village of Pilton will help a revised bid.

Professional security guards may also be recruited to patrol the area if the event is granted a licence.

Everyone knows how small CCTV cameras are and I don't think they'll be an issue

Melvyn Benn
One Pilton resident said: "I think CCTV will be a good idea, although we only had one or two incidents here last year.

"It might be better though, if we were given a year off, to give it a bit of a rest."

Villager Vernon Blythe is against the festival. He said: "It really does convert the village almost into a town and CCTV really would be quite intrusive.

"Last year we had people sleeping all around the place and we had part of our fence damaged.

"The proximity to the village of the festival is my principal objection."

Security measures

Melvyn Benn of Glastonbury Festivals, said: "Everyone knows how small CCTV cameras are and I don't think they'll be an issue - they are so unobtrusive.

"They will be watching those that we think will be creating crime and disorder and the people that operate them will be trained professionals."

Mendip councillors are due to consider a revised bid for the 2003 festival - which includes the security measures - next month.

"I believe this is the most complete application that has ever been submitted for Glastonbury - a top-class festival which has become part and parcel of British culture," Mr Benn said.


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See also:

13 Dec 02 | England
10 Dec 02 | Entertainment
30 Jun 02 | Entertainment
01 Jul 02 | Entertainment
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