BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: England  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 10 December, 2002, 21:57 GMT
Mines may power county's future
Disused mine at Botallack
Scientists have identified 90 possible project sites
Abandoned mine workings on the Cornish coast could be potential sources of renewable energy.

The government has invested 100,000 in the unique Waveshaft project to test out the theory.

Waveshaft will investigate whether wind turbines can be installed in mine tunnels which are linked to sea caves.

Scientists believe gusts of air created by the waves rushing in could drive the turbines and generate electricity.

Disused mine at Botallack
Botallack is an example of a disused coastal mine
Most wavepower projects involve the construction of a large concrete chamber on the coast.

When waves rush in, air is forced down pipes and through turbines which generate power.

But if the Waveshaft project is successful, millions of pounds could be saved.

Cornish scientists have identified 90 locations for the Waveshaft project.

Secret location

They have highest hopes for an old working known as Windy Adit, at a secret location on the north Cornwall coast.

Dean Millar, lecturer in mining engineering at Camborne School of Mines, is excited by the possibilities the idea offers.

"The big advantage of using old mine workings is that you save money by not having to excavate the rock," he said.

"It is the huge cost that is inhibiting the development of shoreline wavepower throughout the world."

Hugely beneficial

The Waveshaft project will be included in a degree course in renewable energy starting at the School of Mines next year.

Project leader Hayden Scholes said such a "green energy" project could be hugely beneficial to the county.

He said: "Cornwall has got plenty of resources and a lot of people who know what they are doing in the area of renewable energy.

"This is a huge opportunity. We are very well placed and we just need to get on and do it."


Click here to go to BBC Cornwall
See also:

12 Nov 01 | UK
13 Sep 02 | Scotland
21 May 02 | Scotland
12 Nov 01 | Scotland
11 Sep 01 | Scotland
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more England stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more England stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes