BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: England  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 14 November, 2002, 18:10 GMT
Town cleans up after floods
Flood waters in Cornwall
St Ives was hit by floods
A massive clean-up operation has begun in a Cornish town which was flooded overnight.

St Ives was hit by flood water up to five feet (1.52 metres) deep in places.

The town's inshore lifeboat was used in the streets to ferry people to safety after floods devastated it.

Flooding also affected the town's main gas supply, which residents were told not to use, and closed the minor injuries unit at the nearby Edward Hain Hospital.


It's sheer devastation

Jeanette Heathorn,
St Ives resident
About 18 people had to be rescued during the floods, including a 90-year-old woman.

The worst affected areas in the town were Tregenna Place and Stennick, when the force of water from the swollen River Stennick led to the collapse of a retaining wall.

Staff from Penwith District Council were out overnight distributing sandbags.

The council said it would look at the issue of flooding in the town and do all it could to stop it happening again.

Businesses and home owners began assessing the damage caused.

Resident John Painter said: "The nearest I've seen to this is three or four inches over shop doorsteps, but this is totally ridiculous."

Car in flood
Roads were also hits by floods
Resident Jeanette Heathorn said: "It's sheer devastation.

"The baker's shop had loaves of bread floating six inches from the ceiling and the Chinese shop had a ton-and-a-half refrigerator just lifted across the shop floor.

"There's mud and broken glass everywhere."

Penwith council's principal engineer, Peter Verran, said: "The highway drainage couldn't cope with the amount of water coming through the catchment area.

"The highway water, combined with the water of the river, burst the bank and consequently ended up at the bottom of the town where we always have a problem.

"The whole district was affected. We're now trying to make amends."

Some people have been told they could be without gas for three days.

Damage limitation

It is unclear how much the flooding will cost insurance companies.

But a spokesman for the Association of British Insurers, Emma Grange, said it was important flood victims take precautions in case of further incidents.

She said: "The first port of call is to secure your property and make sure you limit any further any damage.

"Get all your belongings out and then contact your insurance company as soon as you can.

"Those who have insurance in place, most people will be able to claim."


Click here to go to BBC Cornwall
See also:

14 Nov 02 | England
13 Nov 02 | England
12 Nov 02 | England
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more England stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more England stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes