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Wednesday, 23 October, 2002, 18:02 GMT 19:02 UK
Executor 'unaware of Diana will wishes'
Paul Burrell
Mr Burrell worked for Diana up until her death
An executor of Princess Diana's will was unaware of the existence of a letter detailing her wishes that her jewellery go to her sons after her death, a court has heard.

Produced at the Old Bailey trial of butler Paul Burrell, the letter explained that she wanted three-quarters of the value of her 21m estate to go to Princes William and Harry, and a quarter to her 17 godchildren.

And it added that she wanted William and Harry to have all her jewellery so their wives could "in due course" have the use of it.

However the Bishop of London, the Rt Rev Richard Chartres, who was appointed an independent executor of Diana's will shortly after her death, said he had no knowledge of those wishes.

Kensington Palace

Under cross-examination by Lord Carlile QC, the Bishop also said he did not know her sister Lady Sarah McCorquodale and mother Frances Shand Kydd, joint executors of the will, had been shredded Diana's documents.

The court has heard that Lady Sarah spent two weeks destroying some of her correspondence.

The Bishop had been called to give evidence at Mr Burrell's trial by prosecutor William Boyce QC, who asked him: "Did he ever seek your authority to remove property from Kensington Palace?"

The Bishop could not recollect Mr Burrell asking permission.

Treasure trove

Father-of-two Mr Burrell, 44, from Farndon, Cheshire, is accused of stealing hundreds of personal items from the Princess's estate and property belonging to Prince Charles and Prince William.

He has denied theft.

Earlier on Wednesday, the court heard that items of crockery addressed to the Prince of Wales were discovered by police at Mr Burrell's home.

The china, from a firm appointed by the Queen, was wrapped in bubble wrap and tissue paper and found in a box in the loft, Detective Sergeant Grant Sidey told the jury.

The box - labelled HRH Prince of Wales, The Office, Kensington Palace - was one of hundreds of items discovered by the detective and his team during their search Mr Burrell's home on 18 January, 2001.

The trial continues.

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 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Nicholas Witchell reports
"In court a most unexpected development"
See also:

21 Oct 02 | England
21 Oct 02 | England
18 Oct 02 | England
16 Aug 01 | UK
17 Oct 02 | England
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