BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: England  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Monday, 14 October, 2002, 13:11 GMT 14:11 UK
Worker in 'collar and tie' sex row
The Department for Work and Pensions in Birmingham
The dress code was introduced in June
A civil servant is challenging a government department after he was forced to wear a collar and tie for work.

Ian Jarman says the new rule is an example of sexual discrimination - because women can wear what they want.

He is being backed by his trade union which is planning to take the case to an employment tribunal.

Mr Jarman, who has worked for the Department for Work and Pensions in Moseley, Birmingham, for the past 26 years, said he had never had to wear a tie to work before.

Ian Jarman
Mr Jarman never wore a tie to work

The dress code was introduced in June this year and since Mr Jarman has had two disciplinary hearings because he refused to follow the new rules.

He said he had been wearing a tie since September but only because he risked losing his job if he did not comply.

"Women are allowed to wear an open shirt and trousers, many even wear a t-shirt," he said.

"If I wear an open shirt without a tie it's a disciplinary offence for which I could potentially get the sack - it's sex discrimination.

Smart image

"A lot of my male colleagues aren't happy about the new dress code."

A spokeswoman from the Department for Work and Pensions said they would not comment on individual cases.

"The dress code was introduced in April to give a more professional appearance to staff who deal with members of the public," she said.

"We require a smart and professional image from all of our staff, but there is no specific requirements for women."


Click here to go to BBC Birmingham Online
See also:

05 Oct 99 | Business
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more England stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more England stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes