BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: England  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 8 October, 2002, 05:44 GMT 06:44 UK
Dung power gets green award
Pylons
The power station is supplying the national grid
Britain's first dung-fired power station has won an environmental award.

The pioneering 7.7m complex, at Holsworthy, north Devon, has won the UK Euro Solar award for 2002 for its builders, German-based Farmatic UK.

The plant runs on around 1.6m tons of slurry collected each year from 30 local farmers.

At full capacity, it will produce around 1.4 megawatts of power.

Muck spreading
Slurry for the station comes from local farms

The accolade was awarded by Energy 21, a branch of the Euro Solar educational charity, which creates awareness and understanding of renewable energy.

The plant started producing electricity for the National Grid earlier this year.

Slurry is fermented in two digesters and produces methane gas to power turbines to produce electricity.

The plant's processes also produce hot water for domestic use.

The plant was funded with a European grant of over 3.5m, as well as money from Farmatic.

There has been wide interest in the plant from across UK, and Farmatic said it was hoping to establish others around the country.

Global priority

The company said: "What we are doing is very safe and a lot of people have shown an interest in the UK, but they are waiting to see this one running first.

"We hope to build at least 100 farms in the UK."

Energy 21 said: "Power generation cannot rely indefinitely on sources of energy such as provided by coal, gas, oil and nuclear fuels.

"To solve these issues, a shift to methods of producing heat and electricity that do not compromise the environment and the needs of future generations is a global priority."

Dung-fuelled power stations are popular in both Germany and Denmark, with about 20-large scale plants operating in each country.


Click here to go to Devon
See also:

18 Jul 02 | England
17 May 02 | England
05 Aug 01 | Science/Nature
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more England stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more England stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes