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Friday, 4 October, 2002, 11:08 GMT 12:08 UK
Valley flood plans rejected
Tamar Valley
The Tamar Valley will not be flooded
Plans put forward by the National Trust to flood part of a valley on the Devon-Cornwall border have been rejected.

The trust wanted to breach an embankment on its Cotehele estate in the Tamar Valley to create almost 40 acres of wetland.

Local people opposed the plans, saying it would spoil the view and could harm wildlife.

On Thursday, councillors rejected the plans, saying it could make it dangerous for craft to navigate the River Tamar.

River Tamar
Questions over river use were raised
Under the proposals, a bank would have been breached in three places and water allowed to flow onto agricultural land to help form a reed bed.

The trust said many reeds have been lost in the area over the past 100 years, and they are important for a range of species.

But some nearby residents had said there was no need to spoil what is described as a "fantastic view".

Concerns were also raised that several popular walks would be lost and the area is also a popular hunting site for barn owls.

The question of river navigability was also raised.

Independent study

Objectors said the change in water direction would cause the Tamar to silt up and block the passage of many vessels that use it.

An independent study was commissioned by the trust into river use.

Brian Muelaner of the National Trust said: "There is no sign of any evidence that it would affect the area negatively."

However, councillors at Caradon District Council said the plans could not go ahead.

Senior planning officer Robert Lacey said: "There is still a lack of any information on the effects it may have on the erosion of the channel and the landscape.

"Members [of the council] were not convinced it was entirely safe to go ahead without more information."


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04 Jan 02 | England
12 Dec 01 | England
12 Nov 01 | England
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