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Thursday, 26 September, 2002, 20:30 GMT 21:30 UK
Speeders' convictions challenged
speed graphic
Missing signs might mean drivers were within the law
Fifty thousand motorists caught speeding in Suffolk could have been wrongly convicted, it is claimed.

The Association of British Drivers said many motorists had been convicted of speeding offences on Suffolk roads where it is claimed the 30 mile per hour limit has not been legally introduced.

Three years ago, Alan Howe, who lives in Suffolk, was caught speeding outside an area with street lights or speed limit signs and started asking questions about the law.

Mr Howe told BBC Look East: "The more I looked into it, I came to the conclusion it was an unenforceable speed limit."

Alan Howe
Alan Howe: Had speeding conviction overturned

Roads with street lights 200 yards apart are called restricted.

They have 30 mile per hour speed limits.

When the lights finish, the limit can still be 30 miles per hour but there must be signs warning motorists that their speed must not exceed the limit.

The extended area must also be covered by separate legislation.

The Association of British Drivers said many drivers in the county had been convicted of speeding offences in areas without the necessary legislation.


We're hoping to get the county council to admit it's made mistakes

Malcolm Heymer, Association of British Drivers

Suffolk County Council has said it will examine the issue.

The Association of British Drivers wants more than a clarification of the matter.

"We're hoping to get the county council to admit its made mistakes, and to reimburse all those drivers who've been wrongfully convicted," the association's Malcolm Heymer said.

Reimbursement would include fines, removing points from licences, and paying related costs such as increased insurance premiums.


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See also:

29 Jul 02 | England
21 Apr 02 | England
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