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Wednesday, 18 September, 2002, 12:40 GMT 13:40 UK
Kitchen recipe for car fuel
Car exhaust fumes
The new fuel hopes to cut harmful emissions
Cars could soon be running on an environmentally-friendly fuel - created by a man using a diesel, bean oil and water in his kitchen.

Industrial chemist Paul Day, from Sittingbourne, Kent, blended the ingredients in an attempt to find a way of cutting harmful emissions in fuel.

Now he has been given a government grant to research what he has called AquaFuel.

His creation came about after he read an article which said that if water could be incorporated into fuel it could reduce pollution.


It is when you consider the applications of aquafuel that the huge environmental benefits become clear

Paul Day

This is because it burns more efficiently and therefore creates fewer toxic by-products such as nitrous oxide.

Mr Day said: "The big problem is that oil and water don't mix, so the fuels are not stable for more than a few weeks.

"For decades companies around the world have tried and failed to solve this problem.

"I couldn't get it out of my mind. So eventually I got a bottle of fuel and a bottle of water and mixed the two.

"To stabilise it I used a pre-synthesised additive that I had in my garage which is derived from castor beans."

He then blended the solution to form a milky-white solution.

Three years later, using money from the Department of Trade and Industry, he has set up his own company, AquaFuel Research.

The fuel can also be used without the need for expensive conversions. Mr Day uses it in his own car which normally runs on diesel.

"It can be used in the same way as any other fuel which is what makes it so exciting. It is a straightforward fuel but this is very new chemistry," Mr Day said.

Environmental benefits

He is currently is contact with several companies to help distribute the fuel but he thinks it will not be available to the public for a few years.

Mr Day added: "I knew from day one that my ideas for fuels were a great leap forward in clean fuel technology.

"It is when you consider the applications of aquafuel that the huge environmental benefits become clear.

"Imagine cars, lorries, ships, aircraft, and even oil-fired power stations, all running on fuel which produces more power with a substantially reduced environmental and health impact."


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17 Sep 02 | Business
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