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Monday, 23 September, 2002, 16:03 GMT 17:03 UK
'No inquest surprises' says Campbell daughter
Donald Campbell
Donald Campbell: Reached 276mph in Bluebird
The daughter of the speed record breaker Donald Campbell has said she expects "no surprises" at his inquest next month.

Gina Campbell was in Coniston, Cumbria, on Monday to open a jubilee bench and sign created by local blacksmith Chris Bramhall.

She will return next month for the inquest and says it will put an end to 35 years of speculation about her father's death.

Campbell was trying to break his own water speed record of 276 mph on 4 January, 1967, when the nose of the boat lifted and the craft somersaulted, killing him.

Suicide speculation

Divers found his remains in May 2000 in a racing suit close to where the 46-year-old's boat Bluebird was dragged from Coniston Water, Cumbria, two months previously.

Coroner Ian Smith said the inquest will be held at John Ruskin School in Coniston on Friday, 25 October, and is expected to last a day. Gina Campbell said: "It is going to be very interesting, I've had the privilege of seeing the accident investigator's report.

"The Coroner Ian Smith put on a very professional guy who's obviously been to consult with me and various other members."

She said there would be no surprises and the hearing would put to rest any speculation that Donald Campbell committed suicide.

Inquest adjourned

"It will now come up with all the engineering and mathematical facts and figures and the most likely cause of what went wrong on that fateful day in January 1967," she said.

An inquest in Barrow-in-Furness in August 2001 was opened and adjourned.

At the inquest it was confirmed the remains were those of Mr Campbell.

They were recovered by the same diving team which salvaged Bluebird to stop it being plundered by trophy hunters.


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See also:

16 Aug 01 | UK
10 Aug 01 | UK
29 May 01 | UK
08 Mar 01 | UK
04 Feb 01 | UK
18 Jun 00 | UK
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