BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: England  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Monday, 9 September, 2002, 15:20 GMT 16:20 UK
Geldof launches genocide centre
Beth Shalom centre
The centre should be open by 2005
Campaigner Bob Geldof has unveiled plans for the world's first genocide research centre in Nottinghamshire.

The singer said the 10m Aegis Institute, which will be built in Laxton near Ollerton, is needed to help prevent atrocities internationally.

Mr Geldof said: "If you say `never again' you have to show you mean it.

"Words without actions are no use to dead people."

 Bob Geldof
Bob Geldof is a tireless campaigner

The Aegis Institute, due to open in 2005, will give a permanent home to the work of the Genocide Prevention Initiative.

It will be built next to the existing Beth Shalom Holocaust Centre and is scheduled to open in 2005.

"This centre wishes to challenge our assumptions and indifference," Mr Geldof said.

It will house an exhibition on the causes and consequences of genocide and provide education, conference and research facilities.

"We want to raise issues of politics, ideology, poverty, the environment, and most importantly, the international will to act," he said.

Aegis was launched in London two years ago.

One of the project's creators, James Smith said: "When genocidal ideology causes a tragedy, it can affect us all.

"That's why we all need to know about it."

Lives saved

Mr Smith launched Aegis in 2000 with co-creator Stephen Smith to research the causes of genocide and give governments early warning of possible future holocausts.

As the genocide centre is built in Britain, another centre will be built in Rwanda to commemorate the one million people who died in the genocide of the 1994 civil war.

Marcus Storch, vice-president of the Nobel Commission, joined Mr Geldof at Monday's event.

He dedicated a memorial to Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish diplomat who risked his life to save tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews from the Nazis.


Click here to go to Nottingham
See also:

06 Sep 02 | Entertainment
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more England stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more England stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes