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Wednesday, 31 July, 2002, 17:37 GMT 18:37 UK
'Secret garden' gets Tudor makeover
The garden c1900
Terraces were once laid out in the garden
A garden which has remained untouched behind walls for 50 years is being restored to its former glory.

The estate of Easton Manor in Lincolnshire was planted in the 16th Century with meadows, gardens and an orchard.

They stood alongside the manor house which was knocked down in the 1950s leaving the gardens to grow wild.

Now the latest owner, Ursula Cholmeley, is working to recreate the splendour of the gardens near the A1 between Grantham and Stamford.

Dog in the overgrown garden
A bridge and follies adorn the garden
The estate was used to billet troops during World War II and the house was in such a poor state after the war that it was knocked down.

Ms Cholmeley says: "It was such a tragedy throughout the country when a lot of big houses were pulled down after the war.

"People never thought they would be able to manage that size of house again.

"It is exciting how many projects are now restoring gardens and restoring big houses and giving them back some of their life."

Outhouse in the garden
Groups of enthusiasts have visited the garden
She says restoration work at the 10-acre Easton Walled Gardens has uncovered old avenues and terraces as well as rare flowers.

Other remaining features are hundreds of yards of wall, wrought iron gates and a bridge.

Ms Cholmely, a descendant of the original owner, says it is also hoped more will be learned about when they were originally created.

"As far as we can tell most of it was laid out by the 2nd Baroness Cholmeley whose initials you can still see in the gate."

Groups can currently tour the garden by prior appointment.


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