BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: England  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 30 July, 2002, 19:07 GMT 20:07 UK
'Votes for women, or the drinks are off'
Golf club
West Norfolk's lady golfers could get voting rights
One of Prince Andrew's favourite golf clubs faces a dry 19th hole unless rules that discriminate against women are changed.

The Royal Norfolk Golf Club has had its application for a new drinks licence put on ice until it changes rules that prevent women members from voting at meetings.

The club, which is not far from the Queen's estate at Sandringham, counts Prince Andrew among its 740 members.

The order for the change in club rules has come from West Norfolk magistrates who considered the club's application to renew its licence to sell alcohol.


Now club members will vote to amend the rules, allowing women to vote

Club secretary Major Nigel Carrington Smith
Now the club has until 5 September to introduce the changes.

Club secretary Major Nigel Carrington Smith said: "At the moment, if there's a meeting of any sort, the men vote and the ladies don't."

He said the club had been aware its current policy could affect its application.

"We thought it might happen. It's a European thing I think. Clubs are not allowed to discriminate against any gender."

He said the order was not unusual and every sports club has to examine its rules to ensure equality.

Human rights

Women have always been allowed to join the club, which is more than 100 years old, but barred from voting.

"Now club members will vote to amend the rules, allowing women to vote," said Major Carrington Smith.

Under the 1964 Licensing Act the rules that apply to clubs applying for a liquor licence say all members should have voting rights.

An Equal Opportunities Commission spokeswoman said a public authority that granted a discriminatory licence would be in breach of the European Convention on Human Rights.


Click here to go to Norfolk
See also:

13 Feb 02 | England
15 Mar 02 | Breakfast
13 Mar 02 | Politics
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more England stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more England stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes