BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South North Midlands/East West/South-West London/South
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: England  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Friday, 19 July, 2002, 13:43 GMT 14:43 UK
Experts 'amazed' by crop circle designs
Crop circle
The study of crop circles is known as "cereology"
Leading crop circle investigators from all over the world are swapping theories at a conference in Somerset.

Andy Thomas, an organiser of the three-day conference in Glastonbury which opened on Friday, said people were still puzzling over "astonishing new and unexplained formations".

"The popular perception is that the issue of crop circles died down a few years ago," he said.

"But there are still many incredibly sophisticated designs appearing in the fields and for every man-made formation there are several that you just cannot explain."

Green men

Some attending the symposium - which includes tours of crop circle sites in Wiltshire - are convinced that the circles are created by spaceships or aliens.

Others say they occur naturally as a result of wind and rain.

"There are so many unsolved parts to the mystery," said Mr Thomas.

The Tor at Glastonbury
Glastonbury Tor has "mystical" links
"You have to look at some of the wonderful designs we are still getting and say whatever is going on here it displays a level of intelligence - but that doesn't necessarily mean green men from Mars."

The theories surrounding their formation range from natural energies to telepathic fields created by humans.

"You name the theory - someone will have it," said Mr Thomas.

One of the most "fantastic" designs to appear recently was a huge formation near Stonehenge in Wiltshire, he said.

The Glastonbury Symposium, now in its 12th year, claims to be the world's largest international gathering of cereologists - people who study crop circles.

The town, in the legendary "Isle of Avalon", is known for its spiritual and mystical associations.


Click here to go to BBC Wiltshire
See also:

17 Nov 01 | England
17 Aug 01 | Science/Nature
09 Aug 00 | Science/Nature
09 Aug 00 | Science/Nature
09 Aug 00 | UK
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more England stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more England stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes