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Tuesday, 21 May, 2002, 19:55 GMT 20:55 UK
Nudists' victory over ramblers
graphic
Ramblers in Cumbria have lost a fight to have a footpath running through a naturist camp officially recognised on a map.

It means they have no right to roam through the site on sand dunes near Haverigg which have been used by the Lakeland Outdoor Club since 1972.

Although the dunes were sold to a farmer 10 years earlier, ramblers had been trying to prove that it was once well used as a footpath.

Following a public inquiry which began in 2001, a government inspector has told the nudists he will order that only 400 yards of the path can be used by walkers.


It is an area of special scientific interest, but not because of lesser hairy naturists

Peter Miller, nudist

Peter Miller, a member of the club which leases the land at Sandacres, said: "We are relieved and a little bit sad that it got to this stage.

"We are pleased... but we are all of the opinion that we could have accommodated some arrangement which might have saved our landlord, the club and the county council a lot of money."

The decision will mean only the small section of the path belonging to Millom Town Council will be open to the ramblers.

Special interest

But the sand dunes the naturists use will remain private.

Mr Miller, 60, said: "It is a level area, well sheltered and about two kilometres from the nearest village.

"Part of it is designated an area of special scientific interest - but not because of the chance of seeing lesser hairy naturists.

"It is a habitat for wild plants and natterjack toads."


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17 Oct 01 | England
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