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Friday, 17 May, 2002, 13:18 GMT 14:18 UK
Devon dung plant 'first of many'
Dung-fired power station
The power stations are more common in Europe
A pioneering dung-fired power station in Devon could be the first of a network of "green" energy plants, according to the firm behind it.

The complex in Holsworthy will run on 1.6m tonnes of slurry from 30 local farms each year.

Methane gas from the fermented slurry will power the station, to produce electricity for the national grid.

The process will also provide hot water for low cost heating around Holsworthy, and organic manure for farmers to use on their land.

Local farmers will provide raw materials for the power station
Slurry has come from local farms

Jurgen Fink, the managing director of the German company which built the plant, Farmatic UK, said: "We have been approached by groups of farmers and food processors interested in setting up similar facilities.

"I would say that within a few weeks we should have the right quality gas to produce electricity.

"We hope to start as many plants as possible."

The project was funded with a European grant of more than 3.5m and a similar sum from Farmatic.

Dung-fuelled power stations are popular in Germany and Denmark, which both have about 20 large-scale plants in operation.


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