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Wednesday, 6 March, 2002, 16:45 GMT
'Terror triplets' named and shamed
Shane Morris in car
Shane Morris hurries from Medway Magistrates court
Magistrates have defended their decision to name and shame teenage triplets who broke an anti-social behaviour order.

Shane, Natalie and Sarah Morris, all 13, had the order imposed on them in February 2001 after a seven-month intimidation campaign in Gillingham town centre, Kent.

Magistrates sitting in Chatham found they had breached the order when they hurled abuse at staff outside Woolworths.

The court heard how the three swore, made rude hand gestures and kicked the door of the store on 11 October.


They [the triplets] are that way and that's the way they are going to stay

Colin Hogan, Shopkeeper

Chairman of the Bench Anne Echlin said: "We are satisfied that they were involved in the commotion outside for some considerable time."

A shop CCTV video was shown at the hearing and staff gave evidence about what had happened.

Although the trio, from Gillingham, admitted they had been at the location, they denied involvement in the incident.

Mrs Echlin said: "We feel it is in the public interests that the full facts of this case should be reported."

Despite a court order banning the naming of the three being lifted, one of the harassed shopkeepers, Colin Hogan, said: "If they break these anti-social orders you will have to take them away and lock them up.

"Some will learn from that, some will continue until they reach their teens and then become proper criminals and end up in prison.

"They are that way and that's the way they are going to stay."

Sentencing was adjourned until 26 March.

The maximum penalty for breaking an anti-social behaviour order is five years.

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The BBC's Robert Hall
"The orders were fully supported by Kent Police"

Click here to go to Kent
See also:

25 Feb 02 | Education
Special orders curbing pupils
29 Jan 02 | UK Politics
Blunkett to take on yobs
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