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Commonwealth Games 2002

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Friday, 1 March, 2002, 19:56 GMT
Lineker backs reading scheme
Gary Lineker
Gary Lineker (right) says he reads books to his children
Gary Lineker, the former England football international, has launched a scheme which will see volunteers from the business community helping youngsters with their literacy skills.

The "Right to Read" project is a national campaign organised by Business in the Community, the group dedicated to corporate social responsibility.

Lineker described the scheme as "fantastic", surrounded by youngsters at Northfield House Primary School in Leicester.

He said: "It is great that people are volunteering their time to go to schools and read with children.

Community help

"They get so much out of this and their reading improves from such individual attention."

Lineker revealed he reads to his own children - their current favourite being Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.

He said: "I read to my children all the time. We have read the other three and enjoyed them immensely."

The Leicestershire launch of the Right to Read campaign was backed by the company behind the Books for Schools campaign, Walkers Crisps.

Martin Glenn, the company's chief executive, said: "Helping to boost reading skills of youngsters is one of the best ways of giving something back to the community."


Click here to go to Leicester
See also:

10 Dec 01 | England
Schools try 'carrot and stick'
29 Oct 01 | Education
Phonics teaching 'not sound enough'
01 Mar 01 | Entertainment
Scots bookworms top poll
26 Jan 01 | Education
Reading links firms with schools
20 Jan 00 | Education
Rose-tinted help with reading
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