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SERVICES 
Wednesday, 12 December, 2001, 12:36 GMT
Wild breeding boosts Tamar salmon
Eggs being extracted
Eggs are taken from returning salmon
Thousands of salmon are being bred at secret locations in the South West.

They are being reared for release into the River Tamar - the border between Devon and Cornwall.

Four-year-old hen salmon are being trapped as they reach the West Country from Greenland to spawn.

Up to 5,000 eggs are taken from each fish and then fertilised.

They are being incubated under close guard by conservationists and anglers.

Future stocks

The young fry will be released shortly after hatching - about three months from fertilisation.

The exercise is being carried out to safeguard the future of salmon stocks in the region.

Other recent conservation efforts on the river have included the flooding of 35 acres of land on the National Trust's Cotehele estate.

The flooded area will gradually become a marine-life habitat.


Click here to go to Devon


See also:

12 Nov 01 | England
Flooding to create nature reserve
06 Nov 01 | England
Dockyard to increase nuclear waste
29 Aug 01 | Northern Ireland
Anglers' heaven after great escape
22 Aug 01 | Sci/Tech
UK estuaries 'risk becoming deserts'
06 Aug 01 | Northern Ireland
Salmon tagging scheme criticised
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