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Tuesday, 27 November, 2001, 17:46 GMT
Victim's parents to meet government doctor
Wayne Jowett
Wayne Jowett died a painful death
The parents of a teenager who died after a hospital blunder are to meet the government's chief medical officer.

Wayne Jowett's parents say new government guidelines put in place following the 18-year-old's death do not go far enough.

Wayne Jowett, from Nottingham, died in February after the leukaemia treatment Vincristine was wrongly injected into his spine instead of a vein.

New labelling has been introduced, but Wayne's parents will tell chief medical officer Professor Liam Donaldson that fail safe syringes should be put in place.

Human error

Wayne who was an apprentice mechanic, was unconscious for almost a month after the mistake, before dying slowly from a creeping paralysis that eventually stopped his heart.

His mother Stella Brackenbury said they will ask Professor Donaldson to introduce the new syringes to cut out human error.

"It is going to be interesting what he is going to come up with.


It seems such a waste that our son died and nothing has been done about it to stop it happening again

Wayne Jowett, father
"We know it is going to take a lot of funding and a lot of backing but if it had been introduced over a period of time surely it would be fully in place now."

A spinal syringe would be designed so it cannot physically be joined to an ampoule containing a drug which should not be given spinally.

Since 1975 at least 13 patients have died or been paralysed as a result of being injected spinally with the anti-cancer drug Vincristine.

The Department of Health has now issued firm instructions to hospitals across England and Wales.

'Brick wall'

There will be a register of doctors allowed to administer the drug, it will be locked away from other drugs and new warning labels will be introduced.

Wayne's father, also called Wayne Jowett, said it was not enough and mistakes could still be made.

"Every time we come up against something - we are coming up against a brick wall.

"It seems such a waste that our son died and nothing has been done about it to stop it happening again."


Click here to go to Nottingham
See also:

15 Aug 01 | Health
Fatal jab doctor faces GMC
03 Aug 01 | Health
Patient safety watchdog appointed
20 Apr 01 | Health
A story everyone should read
19 Apr 01 | Health
'Wayne was in a lot of pain'
19 Apr 01 | Health
New rules to save patients' lives
02 Feb 01 | Health
Drug blunder patient dies
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