BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in: UK: England
Front Page 
World 
UK 
England 
Northern Ireland 
Scotland 
Wales 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
Sunday, 14 October, 2001, 07:53 GMT 08:53 UK
Plan to excavate Rose Theatre
Model depicting the Rose Theatre in the 1600s
The remains are in better condition than expected
The discovery that the remains of Shakespeare's Rose Theatre are in a reasonable condition has led to calls for more to be spent on excavating the site.

The Rose, where many of William Shakespeare's plays were first performed, was rediscovered in 1989.

It is the only Elizabethan theatre left in the world of which there are substantial remains.

English Heritage have now put up 17,500 for a preliminary excavation of the site after timber planks and posts were found to be well- preserved.

Mike Corfield, chief scientist for English Heritage, said: "It would be magnificent to see th site properly explored and put on show to the public."


The results could lead to important light being shed on the history of Elizabethan theatre, one of Britain's greatest contributions to world culture

Baroness Tessa Blackstone

A trust has been set up to campaign for a full excavation of the site near Southwark Bridge.

The Rose opened in 1587 but was closed in 1605 after staging plays by Shakespeare and others such as Christopher Marlowe and Thomas Kyd.

Baroness Tessa Blackstone, Minister for the Arts, said she was encouraged by what she saw at the site.

"The results could lead to important light being shed on the history of Elizabethan theatre, one of Britain's greatest contributions to world culture."

In 1989 more than half of the Rose's remains were discovered during the development of an office block.

A campaign at the time saved them from being destroyed and since then they have been preserved under layers of concrete, sand and water.

The newly-built Globe Theatre, which is a reconstruction of an Elizabethan open-air theatre, was modelled on the remains of the Rose.


Click here to go to BBC London Online
See also:

13 Apr 99 | Entertainment
Rose Theatre looks up from watery grave
01 Feb 99 | Entertainment
Dame Judi takes the stage
28 Sep 98 | Entertainment
Shakespeare's lost labours found
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more England stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more England stories